Advanstar takes legal action over 'New York Licensing Show'

Samantha Loveday

By Samantha Loveday

March 29th 2009 at 4:30PM
Advanstar takes legal action over 'New York Licensing Show'

Event organiser comes out fighting to protect its brand after last week's news of mooted show in NY.

Advanstar Communications has sent out an email to all exhibitors at this year's Licensing International in a bid to stop any confusion over the recently mooted New York Licensing Show - also revealing it will be taking legal action.

Last week, a company called Trade Show Events announced plans for a show in New York in April 2010, called New York Licensing Show. This, says Advanstar, has led to considerable confusion within the industry and it has quickly moved to put a stop to it.

In the letter, executive VP of Advanstar Global Licensing Group, Georgiann DeCenzo, said: "Over the last few weeks, many of you have received communications from a Linda Cohen, who claims to be launching the 'New York Licensing Show in New York City in April 2010.

"This show is not affiliated in any way with Licensing International Expo (commonly referred to as the 'New York Licensing Show' or the 'Licensing Show') that Advanstar Communications has operated for nearly 30 years.

"Licensing International Expo is the only US-based licensing show sponsored by LIMA and produced by Advanstar.

"As everyone in the licensing world knows, 'New York Licensing Show' is - and continues to be - a name associated with Advanstar. We believe it is inappropriate for Ms Cohen to use the name 'New York Licensing Show' and we have demanded that she immediately stop using that name.

"Protection of intellectual property and brands are the bedrock principles on which the licensing industry flourishes. Advanstar invested considerable energy and resources building the premier licensing show in the United States, and the licensing community associates 'New York Licensing Show' with that event.

"Advanstar must and will take appropriate steps to protect its brand and to ensure that there is no confusion in the licensing world about its show."