BBC's Sherlock sent to North Korea to "encourage change"

Robert Hutchins

By Robert Hutchins

July 4th 2014 at 10:44AM
BBC's Sherlock sent to North Korea to

The programme was shown in 2012 at a film festival in the country’s capital, Pyongyang it has been revealed.

BBC's Sherlock has been sent to North Korea in the hope of “encouraging change” in the country.

The UK government organised a screening of the BBC TV drama starring Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman as a means of offering a different perspective, reports the BBC.

Sherlock was shown in 2012 at a film festival in the country’s capital, Pyongyang it has been revealed.

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office explained it was “one of things we have done to encourage North Korea to be more open to the outside world”.

The drama series was listed among 34 educational, diplomatic and humanitarian initiatives undertaken by the government in order to “encourage change.”

The Pyongyang International Film Festival is held every two years and is an opportunity for North Korean audiences to watch carefully selected Western titles.

Other films screened at the 2012 event included The Decoy Bride, Jet Li’s martial arts film flying Swords of Dragon Gate and the French comedy The Women on the 6th Floor.

“Participating in the film festival in 2012 was a small part of a cultural exchange programme we have with North Korea to show a different perspective of the outside world than they are normally shown.”