PxPixel
Is Flappy Bird the next big licensing star? - Licensing.biz

Is Flappy Bird the next big licensing star?

The free game is making $50,000 a day from in-app adverts
Author:
Publish date:
Flappy Bird.png

Chances are you've already been frustrated by Flappy Bird, the latest addictive app game to hit the headlines.

If you haven't, the concept is simple, you tap the screen to make the bird rise, and have to avoid flying headfirst into big green pipes, and it's notoriously difficult. While Angry Birds makes gamers happy, Flappy Bird makes gamers angry.

And while the game doesn't boast quality graphics, detailed gameplay or a gripping plot, it is already a money maker.

Flappy Bird has been perched on the top spot at the free category on the App and Google Play stores for close to a month and is making, on average, $50,000 a day from in-app ads.

The game has been downloaded 50 million times, Vietnamese developer Dong Nguyen told The Verge thatthere are no plans to tamper with the gameplay.

"The reason Flappy Bird is so popular is that it happens to be something different from mobile games today, and is a really good game to compete against each other," said Nguyen.

"People in the same classroom can play and compete easily because [Flappy Bird] is simple to learn, but you need skill to get a high score.

"Flappy Bird has reached a state where anything added to the game will ruin it somehow, so I'd like to leave it as is. I will think about a sequel but I'm not sure about the timeline.

"I want to make an ads-based game because it is very common in the Japanese market — mini games are free and have ads."

The game has been around since May 2013, and it's sudden rise to popularity has led some to claim the developer is using bots to push the profile of the game.

Naturally, Flappy Bird is now the focus on a range of memes, trends regularly on Twitter and has now been recreated on Minecraft (see below).

With its prescence ever on the rise and while it makes $50,000 a day, it seems only a matter of time before the licensing community, as it did with Angry Birds, takes note.

Licensing.biz has reached out to the developer for comment, and will update this story as and when we can.

Related

Active Visionary: Is licensing ready for Activision's view of the future?

The crossover between toys and video games has never been more prominent, and with the video games eSports market set to hit a value of $1bn by the end of the year, this space definitely isn't one to miss. Robert Hutchins sits down with Activision Blizzard's Tim Kilpin to see how more toy retailers can make the most of and embrace this burgeoning sector