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Max Arguile launches specialist licensing consultancy Reemsborko - Licensing.biz

Max Arguile launches specialist licensing consultancy Reemsborko

The aim of the company is to fill a gap in market for consultancy in new media and emerging areas such as anime, video and mobile gaming, along with specialised art and design brands.
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Former senior licensing manager at GB Eye Max Arguile has launched a new specialist licensing consultancy.

Called Reemsborko, the aim of the company is to fill a gap in market for consultancy in new media and emerging areas such as anime, video and mobile gaming, along with specialised art and design brands.

Reemsborko will offer a full consultancy service for licensees eager to work with different properties as well as advise them on future trends.

Anime in particular has been noted as an area still underserved by licensing in the UK and has been a strong part of Arguile’s portfolio for many years. He will use his vast experience and extensive network of relationships to provide a cost-effective shortcut into anime for licensees that want to get involved.

Before starting his own company, Arguile was the senior licensing manager at GB Eye, Europe’s supplier of wall décor, drinkware and gifting. During a period of over 20 years he negotiated and signed more than 1,000 contracts n the genre of music, film, TV, football, art, brands, video games and anime.

“The pace of change is getting faster as licensees try to spot and serve promising new properties in a crowded marketplace,” said Arguile.

“Reemsborko can make that process much quicker and easier, helping licensees to understand trends, spot potential partnerships and emerging brands and play to their strengths.”

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