Sega sees rise in demand for video game toys - Licensing.biz

Sega sees rise in demand for video game toys

Merchandise a growing revenue stream as firm considers adding AR tech to stationery.
Author:
Publish date:
1_sonic-toy-sega.jpg

Sonic The Hedgehog brand owner Sega has reported an increase in demand for licensed video game toys.

The firm has over 60 licensees making products across EMEA, including figurines from master toy partner Jazwares, construction toys from Meccano, lunchware from Spearmark, bedding from Character World.

“There is definitely increased demand for video game merchandise, with toys and apparel being very good performers,” Sega’s head of brand licensing for Europe Sissel Henno told Licensing.biz. 

“Popular action figures and other toys based on their favourite characters enable kids to experience a different level of brand engagement which also allows for increased imagination in the play pattern.”

Sega has now recognised new opportunities for more interactive licensed content.

“Publishing works well for this, as you can mix interactive content with the print format,” added Henno. 

“We have also had trials using Augmented Reality (AR) technology to provide added value content with T-shirts and with good content this could be extended to apply to more products such as stationery and bedding.”

Sega has also tweaked its overall brand strategy.

“Sega decided to take a more proactive approach to licensing, and we have invested in the in-house infrastructure to allow for an expanding licensing programme," said Henno.

"This is also further encouraged by the fact that licensed merchandise is a growing revenue stream within the company."

Sega: 020 8996 4568

Want to receive up to the minute licensing industry news straight to your inbox? Click here to sign up for the free Licensing.biz Daily Digest and Newsflash services. You can also follow Licensing.biz on Twitter and Facebook.

Related

Screen Shot 2017-03-14 at 10.12.06.png

Generation Gaming: The rise of video games in licensing

With gaming overtaking film as the largest entertainment industry in the world, there has never been a better time to embrace the cross-generational appeal of licensed video games product. With more game franchises pushing into the toys space, Jack Ridsdale examines why this growing market has not yet cracked the mainstream.