Ukie: UK games market was worth £5.11bn in 2017 - Licensing.biz

Ukie: UK games market was worth £5.11bn in 2017

The market gre by 12.4 per cent in 2017.
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The UK games market was worth £5.11bn in 2017, games industry board Ukie has reported, showing 12.4 per cent growth on the previous year.

Hardware figures soared by 29.9 per cent, thanks in large part to the launch of Nintendo Switch.

“These UK figures reveal a solid performance for the physical software market, boosted by a return to growth in the overall console hardware market for the first time since 2014m" commented market researcher GfK’s Dorian Bloch.

"With Sony’s PS4 showing four consecutive years of over 1m units sold per year, a strong performance from Microsoft’s sub £200 Xbox One S and premium core gamer Xbox One X, plus the introduction of Nintendo’s Switch enjoying the best start for a Nintendo home console since the mighty Wii back in 2006, it is clear that the console gaming market is now enjoying a renaissance.”

Boxed software sales were up by 3.1 per cent year-on-year, although still well down on 2014 and 2015 figures. Pre-owned fell by a whopping 15.1 per cent, most likely as consumers keep hold of ‘live’ titles they want to play in the longer term.

Mobile games continued to grow at a rapid pace, shooting up by 7.8 per cent with the overall mobile game market now worth over £1.07bn. The convenience of digital sales also proved popular with the market growing 13.4 per cent.

Licensed toys and merchandise based on gaming properties were up 6.8 per cent, bringing this sector's value to £72.9m. Live gaming events were also up 13.4 per cent, while soundtracks and book showed a decline.

Source: MCV

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